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. i plan to vote for this bill, h.r. 6156, even though i remain strongly opposed to granting russia permanent normal trade relations or pntr, at this time. i would like to explain the reasons why. those who argued for granting russia pntr, which has until now been prevented by what is known as the jackson-vanik amendment, focus on the supposedly bilateral trade benefits. the issue that concerns me and many members is not trade but human rights. advocates of repeal say that the jackson-vanik amendment is outdated and is purely symbolic and therefore should be disregarded. but in the ira of human rights, madam speaker, symbols can have a very great importance. over the years jackson-vanik has become a sign of the continuing u.s. commitment to human rights in russia and elsewhere. repealing the amendment could very well be interpreted as an indication that our commitment is now weakening. this would be a terrible signal to send at a time when putin is in the process of imposing ever tighter restrictions on all opposition to his regime, especially democratic activists and any others who
in support today of this rule and h.r. 6156, to grant permanent normal trade relations to russia. . this important legislation is a small step towards a big reward. without it the united states exporters and service providers will continue to lose business to our foreign competitors that have already have trade relations -- relationships with russia. and once we lose those markets, our competitors will only become stronger and better positioned to surpass the u.s. in a critical marketplace of the 21st century global economy. according to the national association of manufacturers, russia imported over $500 billion in goods last year, and of that total only 5% came from u.s. exports. this bill will lift outdated policies and restrict american access to russian markets. as a result studies show u.s. producers can expect to achieve double-digit increases over the next decade in exports of heavy machinery, agricultural machinery, chemicals, and services. this is particularly critical for my home state of illinois where we have fallen behind japan and korea in these export categories.
] and in russia. 7% of the world's energy is here. -- 70% of the world's energy is here. briefly on human-rights, i do believe actually the great difference between democracy and dictatorship is simply this -- a soft assets, but an important one. and it does not have human- rights that i necessarily proud of, but india does have accountability. china can only become a modern nation if it permits democracy and if it permits secularism, that is equality and presence of trade. until then, it can be successful, but not monitored. >> i want to say three things quickly. i want to follow up on the admirals' comments. it is remarkable to many in the u.s. military that the u.s. is not ratified the convention. we had it pretty sincere effort to bring afford to the senate. we worked a couple of the votes short. i think senator mikulski for her support. i hope we will be allowed to take that up again and get that done as a country. it is challenging to make the case we're making, which is that these potential conflicts over territory should be resolved on the basis of principles when the final conven
, but you are engaging with countries for whom doing that is much simplerlike china, like russia, the state capital company where, you know, your company is your arm not only of foreign economic policy, but of foreign policy full stop. how do you operate in a world with players who are operating under these very different rules? >> well, it's something we do spend quite a bit of time thinking about this. it's not all about china. there are issues with other countries like -- >> russia? >> -- like russia, but not just those two. and the lines are really blurred in terms of where the state ends and where capital and corporate interests begin for many countries. at the state department, we've really tried to create mechanisms through multilateral institutions like the oecd has come up with a platform for competitive neutrality which looks at the different ways that governments can act to subsidize or to give favor to their own state-owned or state-led interests and provide some recommendations for engaging in a platform of competitive neutrality. it's a different way of thinking about the chal
submarine detected 300 miles off the east coast of the united states in late october. russia navy commander announced earlier on june 1, the russian nuclear power subs would return to patrolling the world's oceans as they did in the soviet times. >> bret: jennifer griffin live at the pentagon. thank you. we're learning tonight about the new suspects in september's deadly terror attack on the u.s. mission in libya. incident about to come under scrutiny. herron has the latest. >> reporter: -- catherine herridge has the latest. >> reporter: the list of suspects extends handful of militants aligned with the group jamal network fox news learned. it takes its name from abu ahmed released from the egyptian jail in arab spring. he has close ties to al-qaeda leader ayman al-zawahiri. >> i think we are going to find out that jamal is much more active internationally across, not just in libya and egypt but elsewhere. network is involved in really exploring terrorism throughout the middle east. >> u.s. officials believe jamal established training camps in libya and in the camps that some of the fighter
, and he was the richest man in russia. kind of a bad way. and this is what he said to me about oligarchs and everybody else. if the man is not an oligarchic something is not right with him. everyone had the same starting conditions, everyone could have done it. and he really meant it. very heartfelt and not criticizing himself, he lost $100 million, he had stupidly entrusted a non oligarch. and this non oligarchic by definition not a smart guy, a few hundred million dollars. there is a little bit of that thinking a lot of these guys and it is interesting because very strong parallels, the parallel with the industrial revolution. there's a line from andrew carnegie which is very similar soak carnegie said the talent for organization is rare among men, approved by the fact that it is reward for its possessor. if a man is not an oligarch something is wrong with him. and services can be obtained as partner, the man whose service can be obtained as a partner for the first consideration such as render the question of his capital that we are considering. such men soon create capital and in the
, the house had one bill on the agenda, the bill that would normalize u.s. trade relations with russia and that passed by a vote of 365-43. the senate has yet to take up their version of the measure. a capitol hill reporter fills in the details. >> sports of this bill normalizing trade relations with russia are saying it's long overdue and good for the nation's economy. why is that? >> well, it >> it will hopefully double exports to russia from the united states. it will go across a broad group of products. manufacturers are backing it strongly. it could be airplanes and parts associated with that. locomotives, chemicals, food, clothing. it seems russia likes u.s. products. we expect there to be good and quick growth. >> how is lining up to oppose it? >> it has wide support on capitol hill. even the administration backs the bill. it does seem to have broad support across washington and the country for businesses that want to export products to russia. >> with all of the legislation and that remains to be done in the lame-duck session, this is the first one. what are the prospects in th
.s. intelligence has identified three command and control servers. one is in russia and one in the states that are sending commands to this virus and the u.s. intelligence has now at a later concluded with a high degree of confidence that this virus was developed by state-sponsored actors in excess land, and not in the high degree of confidence that there is a shadow out there that they have another target and that this virus is not going to stay on the leal companies that could move -- oil companies that could move. if you want to start? >> i think so, given the "washington post" sources we don't have to worry about. [laughter] but now i think one, the general realization that we have not seen everything yet sold, second, typical of the cyber type of activities they are probably most crippling in undermining confidence over the public so they need courses of action to address this in the public and how they will do this we haven't really gotten the sense of the external overseas type of the implications from the standpoint of other damage out there. we need to know from the intelligence
.s. -israeli relationship and laterals russia and china again were primarily shaped by the white house. >> in washington, james rosen, fox news. >> bret: are we going over the cliff? if an when the president and congress do reach a deal on the fiscal cliff, what will it look like? we'll get some thoughts from the fox all-stars when we return. i put away money. i was 21, so i said, "hmm, i want to retire at 55." and before you know it, i'm 58 years old. time went by very fast. it goes by too, too fast. ♪ but i would do it again in a heartbeat. [ laughs ] ♪ ♪ >>> right now, as we speak, congress can pass a law that would prevent a tax hike on the first $250,000 of everybody's income. so we really need to get this right. i can only do it with the help of the american people. so, tweet, what was that again? my2k. do what it takes to communicate a sense of urgency. we don't have a lot of time here. >> in order to come to an agreement, republicans are willing to put revenue on the table. time for the president and the democrats to get serious about the spending problem that our country
with us, who may do less harm in the future, hopefully never, russia is one, a lot of computers, russia is much like we are in terms of understanding of the cyber threat, having a lot of smart people doing offensive development primarily for the purpose of -- think of how many ways we can be attacked. also thinking for every measure there is a countermeasure. how do we defend ourselves against potential attacks? we are being proactive and reactive at the same time. putting a lot of money and effort into our government to create a u.s. cyber command. the russians have institutionalize this and have buildings and people and very smart individuals designing ways to disrupt and corrupt systems and do bad things, as we are to our potential adversaries. that mutually assured destruction may be still works between russia and the united states. now let's take a quick look at one of the worst place today in the world -- north korea. they have got atomic bombs, they are a rogue regime, a lot of people there, a lot of smart people, like there are everywhere in the world. they have definitely got a
, and he certainly came out fighting in this interview with russia today. english language russian tv station. not only that absolute refusal to resign and seek exile that you just heard. but also a stark warning to the the west, not to try to intervene militarily in syria. listen. >> i think the price of this invasion, if it happens, is going to be -- whole world are can't afford if you have a problem in syria -- in the region and coexistent let's say. it will have domino effect. effect the world from the atlantic to the pacific. and, you know, the implication [inaudible] >> of course, u.s. officials have no appetite whatsoever for any kind of military action in syria on that at least president assad is correct. russians are frankly still the problem here. >> absolutely. more support for assad from russian officials. in this case today, the foreign minister sergei said that the west simply has to accept that assad is not going to step aside. and if western powers keep insisting that the price is, as he put it, assad's head, it will simply cost more syrian lives. now, russian official
and in russia, and a whole new set of political and social institutions. and my concluding argument is, we really need to be thinking about a social and political adjustment comparable to the one that we -- >> so who puts that in place? the government you say that's bought by the rich? the problem is that how do you solve that? the rich always get control of the government. right? that's why government needs to be as small as possible. the bigger it gets, the more it gets bought. that's the problem. >> actually, i strongly disagree with that. that's a real -- >> that's the premise of your book. >> no, no. that's a counsel of despair to say the government is always going to be controlled and captured by the rich. i think the government can actually be controlled by democratic majorities. think that council of despair is one reason why american society overall is not stepping up to the challenge of our economic times. >> let me bring in robert frank, our wealth editor, for a question. thought? comment? >> thanks. congratulations on the book. >> thank you. >> just a quick question. the discus
of russia initially when they went there to help the russian people, one of the first things they did with the help of the russians to two extreme poverty. my question is, is a risk too much for us so that we would a sickly state thank you and to let the door his shoe on the way out. >> obviously an indonesian case, part of that is just their farm are sensitive to questions of faith and we are so it's not infrequent we would behave in a way that doesn't take into account adequately their cultural sensitivities. this happens all the time and life. what's the right thing to do if someone isn't appreciative you didn't do anything wrong. don't worry about it and sometimes that happens. i wouldn't hesitate to help people unless someone related to the recipient weren't helped by their own kind. i would like to help. >> and i could add something to the indonesian case, there's a thing that exacerbated the relationship that made us were challenging for the ambassador. i'm sure we were still there when he was president wesley had a a policy decision here in the u.s. regarding the military enga
by china, by russia, but others and look for them is one of the biggest is. well it's the u.s. not only national security secrets, the commercial seats as be of much of can be gleaned or stolen from cyberspace. it is a dire threat in part because we shifted so much attention, so much resource and the counterterrorism arena we've forgotten the necessity of old-fashioned counterintelligence and that's an important element of this. >> often i've heard some people involved in counterintelligence tends to be seen as the redheaded stepchild of the intelligence world. why is that when we need it and what is the cure for a? effect in part because it's something we don't want to think about. to think that our agencies and businesses have been penetrated by a foreign power, criminal organization and would rather think about how do we achieve that goal? a foreign-policy goal or profit objectives. but it's more fun. that is more positive and we are very positive nation. we can also be more disciplined about how we think of protecting our intellectual property and most of all our people. >> one of t
, potentially -- occasionally, and then russia. [laughter] and 70% of the world's energy is here. energy becomes so dray dramaticy contagious. what do you do? briefly over human rights. i do believe between democracy and dictatorship is this, a soft asset, but a very important one that why india does not record in human rights that, you know, necessarily be proud of, but they have accountability, and, therefore, i believe that whereas china could be a successful nation, it cannot be a modern nation, and it's only a modern nation if it permits democracy and if it permits secularism, the equality and presence of it. until then, it's successful, but not modern. >> james? >> three things very quickly. first, i want to just follow directly on the admiral's comments about the u.n. convention on the law of the sea. it is remarkable to many of the u.s. military that united states is not ratified the convention. we had a pretty sincere effort to bring it forward to the senate. we were a couple of votes short. i think senator my -- mikulski for the support. i think we can take that up again and get it don
that are of concern to the u.s.. when you look at the consequences for russia, i mean this is not just a regional question. it is about the relationship with another superpower with the u.n.. it's interesting, i am sure that a good percentage of the people here, when bush asked to go to war in iraq without a resolution we are very uncomfortable asking without the resolution and yet we find people now saying maybe obama should do it but for different reasons. i think it's a really big problem for the administration. it's not tied to the election. i think the elections and themselves have problems. >> actually a cautious approach example. >> let me say i agree 100%. don't get me wrong. i don't think us going in and invading, either way there are going to be these perceptions along with the perception of the positive images of the west i was helping syria is by no means going to change the perceptions that we help some countries because of resources versus others. i agree with that 100%. >> i think there's a growing trend in kind -- inside of washington to favor intervention in syria, some kind of
.s. passed -- passed russia for second place and now only trails saudi arabia. the agency says by 2030, the u.s. will export more oil from areas it purchases. >>> a 25-year-old newcomer was elected to the b.a.r.t. board of directors replacing a veteran. he reportedly had strong support from sun contractors. >> he recent lint graduated with a masters in city planning. he's been a supporter for extending b.a.r.t. into western contra costa county. he defeated b.a.r.t. board's president, who came under criticism for a lack of racial diversity when it comes to subcontractor practices. >>> well, san francisco supervisors hope a new report about bedbugs will help after they have to treat the number -- report the number. they don't have to give the exact address but they do have that report the census track they were called to. tennans are predicting the reports will show that bedbugs are a big problem in the city. >>> an nfl player who has been outspoken in his support for same-sex marriage says several oakland raiders players feel the same way. some of the raiders talked to him before sunday's game
with russia and south korea. securing important resources in the south china sea as well as potentially destabilizing or creating a situation in which china doesn't actually have full control of the south china sea for its exports and imports of oil and other natural resources into china. so the issue for the two countries is that being driven by very different factors. >> i know japanese businesses have sort of started to think about the cost benefit of doing business in china because the chinese government has demonstrated their ability to impact business. so i was talking to -- let's he's bring in andrew on this. i suppose the question is whether the chinese are feeling any pinch on their side. >> trade is not everything. don't forget it's not just a financial issue only between china and japan. don't forget the american pivot to asia has complicated things. and also of raising nationalism both in japan and china. a look at japanese politics recently, the current administration has weakened very much by the economy, but also by the rise of another political party and the political pa
as a stroke. now scientists from russia, switzerland and france will try to determine if loan yum poisoning was the cause. to loan yum emits deadly radiation that destroys human tissue, and though it cannot penetrate the stint if it's ingested, it does affect the organs. that is something israel denies. now, as for these tests, at the end of the day they might prove inconclusive. the poison decays very quickly, less than three years. arafat has been buried now for eight years. it is very possible, according to some investigators, that these results might tell us nothing at all. megyn? megyn: wow. david lee, thanks. >>> well, a homeowner shoots a pair of teenagers as they are breaking into his house, but now the prosecutors say he shot them, quote, in a manner that goes way beyond self-defense. trace gallagher walks us exactly through what happened. kelly's court debates, and you will decide who was in the right and who was in the wrong. >>> and president ronald reagan took office saying we needed to downsize government and dramatically cut federal spending, but in order or to make it happen
and israel. supporting it are major nations such as france, russia, china, spain, denmark, portugal, ireland, britain and australia expected to abstain. it will certainly have widespread implications for the fragile middle east, bill. bill: where are the israelis on this rather? what is their response, eric? >> reporter: yeah the israelis say that status could only come from direct talks with no preconditions. those peace talks have stalled because of the continued building in the west bank and continued violence we've seen in the gaza. this does come on the 65th anniversary of the partition that created the two-state solutions, something palestinians and arabs rejected for three generations. >> direct negotiations is the dna of israeli-palestinian political process. any attempt to exert external pressure on israel would serve as a setback to those who are really interested in peace. if what you're interested in is public relations, then, this whole thing is just an exercise in futility. >> reporter: but hamas is now on board. they have rejected this until this weekend when they say they wil
have convinced russia to go against syria? do you think so? >> short answer is, i don't think. but i think it pays to ask the questions. this person is being put forward as secretary of state. what have you done in your post to warrant that? she was also, by the way, absent at the initial vote on the attempt the to break the israeli blockade that was launched out of turkey. when the u.n. convened an emergency session, again at the first session she was nowhere to be found. that's why i said there were other things that could be brought forward at a hearing like that. megyn: i want to talk to you, though, about whether this is secretary rice or ambassador rice's, you know, problem or whether this is a president obama problem. who sets the policy? and i also want to ask you about the other possible choice, which is john kerry. we'll do that after the break. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] while you're getting ready for the holidays, we're getting ready for you. tis the season. for food, for family, and now, something extra -- for you. ♪ megyn: and rejoining us now, michael mukasey, fo
to see the u.n. become a global government, and the u.n. and china and russia which are not yet democratic country. they have veto power on the security council and the general assembly is controlled by nations, despotism, and either we defend it as reagan said or it goes away. and freedom is not the birth right of every human being without everybody fighting for it. >> well put. >> that's an exceptional interview. thank you for hauling yourself out of bed early on that sunday morning. what do you think about that, e-mail us. and the industry is thriving and all because of what they're doing below the surface of the earth. what is the future of american fuel, green or gas? then mitt romney shares a personal story that brings a crowd of 17,000 to its feet, gave goose bumps. how an american flag and a scout leader are making headlines. who is that guy who just absoluted? what's that flag? we're going to tell you. ♪ [ lisa ] my name's lisa, and chantix helped me quit. i honestly loved smoking, and i honestly didn't think i would ever quit. [ male announcer ] along with support, c
. no world cups or presidential elections or midterms. in 2014 we have the russia in the winter olympics. we have the brazilian world cup and midterm elections will you before so there will be election year spending. 2013 is not maxiquadrennial like we called it for last year or mini quadrennial we called the world cup year and winter olympics year. much more difficult because of lack of events in our industry. there is tremendous caution and uncertainty. in those conditions people don't invest. they don't make decisions. they don't make hiring decisions. so i would say unemployment, unless something is done about it, is likely to stay at these levels. of course if they don't reach agreement on the fiscal cliff, it will have very damaging impact on employment and prospects. >> sir martin, thanks for joining us. >> that is wonderfully optimistic view of life. >> we'll be getting back to you on all of that. >> thank you, peter. >> tracy, back to you. tracy: peter barnes, great stuff. interesting how 2013, not posing enough of a good events for advertisers. maybe we've got to come up with somet
to compromise. >> steve: the president of the united states did tell the leader of russia that after the election, he would be more flexible. let's hope he's -- that would apply to the republican party. maybe they can actually get a deal because clearly, social security, medicare, the entitlements, all sorts of stuff has got to be fixed for it to go on. now is the time before it's too late. >> brian: let's hope the russian don't want to sell us bayonets because the president has no interest in that. >> gretchen: let's talk about colin powell. some people, were you surprised that he endorsed president obama again for this election cycle even though he is a republican? now he has some advice actually for the president of the united states. he has found at least two things that he needs to work on. >> it was going to be stiff resistance from the republicans. he did. but at the same time, i think he could have done more with respect to setting the right tone and showing some leadership and these are two areas that i think he really has to focus on in his second term. that is reaching out
at the consequences for russia, this is not just a regional question. it is about a relationship with another superpower with the u.n. we are very comfortable acting with this, but yet we find people saying that maybe obama should do this for a different reason. so i think it is a really big problem for the administration. it is not tied to the election. it is not even a political type of election. >> let me also say that i agree 100%. don't get me wrong. i don't think that us going in and invading is going to change perceptions. i agree. either way, there will be these perceptions. along with positive it images in the west. helping syria is by no means going to change the perceptions that we have some countries because of some countries versus others. >> i think there is a growing trend inside of washington in favor of intervention. some kind of increased action. i see no such trend in the country in public opinion. i just don't see any real support for it. the bottom line is this is horrible, but the american military intervention there would make things astronomically worse for syria and f
at the consequences for russia, i mean, this is not just a regional question. it is about the relationship with another superpower with the u.n.. really, you know, it's interesting. i'm sure that a good percentage of the people here, when bush acted to go to war in iraq, were very uncomfortable acting, and, yesterday, we find people now saying maybe obama should do it for a different reason so i think it's a really big problem for the administration. it's not due to the electionment eng the election is not going to solve that problem for them. it's not a political -- >> actually -- >> a cautious approach -- >> exactly. >> i agree 100%, don't get me wrong. i don't think we could win; right? us invading is going to change perceptions, i agree, but either way, there's going to be these perceptions along with the perceptions of the positive images of the west. us helping syria is by no means going to change the perceptions that we helped some countries because of resources versus others. i agree with that 1 # 00%. >> i think there is a growing trends inside of washington in favor of some inter
? ahead of russia by 2020? >> yeah. one of the ironies is over the last couple of years, the oil industry, fossil fuel, the evil fossil fuel created so many jobs and so much wealth. look at pennsylvania alone, you got to worry about them coming under attack, particularly natural gas. you got a big hollywood movie coming out, anti-fracking and all that stuff. >> steve: the president later today will meet interestingly with union leaders and business leaders, tomorrow he'll meet with ceo's and congress and try to avert the fiscal cliff. what do you make of the meeting with the union guys? >> i got a huge beef with this. unions represent only 8% of sec. there is no way in the world they should be the first ones up. by the way, this is all look just like his jobs council. nothing but academics, union leaders and gigantic businesses. where is the small business? guys, let me tell you, businesses with less than 50 please created 13,000 jobs. where would the president and the country be without them? they never get a seat at the able. we crush them, we crush any hope for recovery. >> brian: we'l
and some others too. >> yeah, i was thinking it bick, not brick. russia has been left out of the equation, foreign corrupt investigation, not a great number here at all. the stock had become a very big institutional favorite. if you recall during the mexican investigation, when "new york times" piece it, the stock was trading between 57 and 58. they were then overridden by a couple of really good, solid quarters. this was not the quarter that anyone was looking for. >> except for those who sold the stock over the last couple of weeks. i mean that stock has started to come through. >> i'm kind of confused why this one is so shocking, if only because they had -- they haven't seen even robust the last couple of months. becky did a fabulous job, because you're talking about a 10th of the country involved. the age of walmart is the able of shopping. so what does this say? >> of course when we consider walmart as a percent of overall public retail sales. the numbers are enormous. this retailer dwarf's others by certain metrics. we think the holiday season is going to be competitive, we think we
buy to bring russia to work out a deal with us to find solution to go forward instead of saying no, no, no, and no again. so i think -- i just want to make the point that paula also made as wonderful as, you know, the modern tools are, the world will not allow us to get away with just tools. we will need to confront these situations, and i think the moment is here where it is overdue, it is extremely urgent to try to find a way that will end the killing in syria not only because it has canings for israel and other countries in indonesia, but because it sits, of course, a terrible negative example to others bad guys in this region and elsewhere who will be encouraged if they can get away with these types of behavior if we don't act. so i think this is a huge challenge that we need to face. and the solution is not a military solution. it's a smart one. >> we have to wrap up soon. to get the conference back on schedule. two more comments here and back there to get them in. >> thank you very much. [inaudible] i'm the australia commissioner in australia. i'm afraid on -- [inaudible] i wante
alter u.s.-china russia confrontation such as the situation in gaza. a three-way relationship on beijing, washington and taipei is positive and quiet, as quiet as it's been over two decades. since that's the only issue on which there is any realistic prospect of armed conflict, and that is small thing. fifth, territorial disputes in the south china sea and east china sea are in my view the most troubling development. chinese confrontation with u.s. treaty allies, principally with japan create serious tensions and introduce unpredictability in the u.s.-china chip as well as offering an image of china's rise is unsettling to countries well beyond concerned rivals. finally, military deployments on both sides. i won't discuss those because i believe jonathan, jonathan pollack will do so in depth in his presentation. what do we expect them president obama's second term and she champagnes first. the main variable and the relationship is china. president obama has had for years to formulate and put in place an approach towards china. in broad terms it is consistent with that of his predecessor
lady liberty dad at this holiday season. rick: russia is warning nato against going patriot missiles near turkey's border with syria. they requested the support as fighting has begun to spill over into the territory. >> you can see this here on the border city, captured by the syrian rebels. armed groups and syrian government forces, targeting rebels and aleppo. fifteen people, including four children were killed. it also leveled a building in the hospital already suffering from six previous airstrikes. heather: israel and hamas claiming victory as the cease-fire appears to be holding. it keeps israel from deploying ground forces were targeting hamas leaders. it is stopping palestinians from launching rocket attacks. but both sides say they are ready to resume fighting if the deal breaks down. how likely is the cease-fire took hold? let's bring in colonel tony shirker. he is part of the center of advanced studies and an author of a great book. >> thank you for coming to join a. >> you're welcome. heather: happy thanksgiving as well. how long is this truce to hold? >> this was starte
it to obviously her area of expertise is russia. it felt to me like this piece was almost fatalistic. she is calling for more american help, she is calling for a greater american leadership role but it sended to me, read to me like she really didn't expect that to happen. in that sense i agree with her. if you look at the campaign we've just been through the president of the united states and his vice president ran on a campaign that embraced this idea of leading from behind. they believe this is working, they believe this is successful. i think the opposite, it seems very clear that secretary rice believes the opposite. i don't think that we are likely to see the united states take a more significant role in the region any time soon, given the way that the president and joe biden ran for the past year. martha: there may be an irony in the fact that susan rice, who is being considered as the next secretary of state, you know, sort of failed to see the broader picture in what happened at benghazi and we wonder what the direction of the next secretary of state would be. i just put that out
combined mpg c-max hybrid. >> steve: quick headlines. nuclear powered submarine from russia coming within 200 miles of the united states in the atlantic. navy officials tell fox news of it not a provocative act and the u.s. detected the sub. that's good to know. today voters could make washington state the first state to legalize the sale and use of recreational marijuana, like alcohol. you would have to be over 21 to buy it. if it pass, the federal government would have the ability to challenge it legality. look for that. gretch, over to you. >> gretchen: back if 2008, they were all about hope and change when they voted for president obama. but four years later, they're now looking for change. frank luntz sat down with a group of ex-obama vote increase ohio and asked them why they're changing their vote and he joins me now. good morning to you, frank. >> good morning. that was a day where we had five different swing states, ohio, pennsylvania, virginia, florida, wisconsin. of all the places i visited, that in ohio, when we talked to those ex-obama voters, it was emotional as they talked
at the expenditures and the resources by china, by russia, by others -- >> uh-huh.. >> -- and what for them is one of their biggest concerns? well, it's the u.s. and not only national security secrets, but increasingly commercial secrets. much of that which can be gleaned or stolen from cyberspace. and it's a dire threat. and i think that in part because so much of our intention, so much of our resources were spent in the counterterrorism arena, we've forgotten the necessity of old-fashioned counterintelligence. and that's an important element of this. a big one. >> often i've heard some people have been involved in counterintelligence say it tends to be seen as a little bit of the red-headed stepchild in the intelligence world. >> uh-huh. >> why is it that when we need it, and what's the cure for it? >> i think in part because it's something we don't want to think about. it's very unpleasant to think that our agencies or our businesses have been penetrated by a foreign power, by a criminal organization, and we'd rather think about, well, how do we achieve that goal, a foreign policy goal or a pro
. russia is strong. poland, ukraine, czech republic have all slowed up. germany and uk actually better for us than france, italy and spain. >> we were just talking about why the euro has been so strong against the dollar. do you have any thoughts on that? when you go back and forth across the globe -- >> no idea. you would have predicted completely the reverse. and it didn't make much sense. draghi this morning comments about fairy land means that he's looking for readjustment. we had a couple meetings with him. we saw very it tough what he called actually a september cliff that we saw 25 companies went to see him in frank further, 23 out of the 25 excepting two agricultural companies, 23 manufacturing service companies, all said september was tough. he described it as a september cliff. >> despite the argument about who spent more, here's what i want to know.saw -- just charact like the dems didn't have a super pac. >> i didn't characterize it that way. >> no, because you lost, it was a massive -- >> i guess we'll have this conversation thousand. 150 million spent to oppose obama and
russia been here for 20 years. those are, quote. sick people that were planning to go ahead with this marathon even though they cancelled it people were furious that they were ever considering it. more in the next hour including someone who lost their home. guys back to you. >> dave briggs, thanks so much for that report. being at the heart of it. >> brian: knicks did played last night packed house. brooklyn put on on thursday. the knicks played unbelievable. the crowd seemed great. i was in dave and busters yesterday as well as the marriott. >> steve: because it was warm. >> brian: it was packed. they were happy for the distraction i believe because there were a lot of people there that didn't look like basketball fans. >> steve: needed something to cheer for and they got it. >> gretchen: now for your headlines. president obama ordering the military to send fuel to new york in the wake of hurricane sandy. gas shortages have sparked insanely long lines and left people panicked. gas will be rationed starting today at noon. people with license plates ending in odd number will
with disabilities act was adopted, we had people from many countries come here. i can think of both first russia, then it was greece, ireland, great britain, a number of other countries came here to learn what we had done and then to pick it up and move forward in their own countries. our legal framework influenced the substance of the convention and is informing its implementation in the 125 countries, i think, that has signed the -- that has ratified it along with the european union. my staff was involved in 2002 when the u.n. first broached this subject of coming up with a convention, and in turn provided to them the substance of the americans with disabilities act, its history, its provisions and what had been done from its adoption in 1990 until 2002, and the changes that it had brought about in our own country. so really, the americans with disabilities act really informed and laid the basis for what the u.n. began to do in 2002 and completed in 2006. so again, i'm very grateful to the leadership of senator kerry, senator mccain, also senator dole who i know is -- is not able to be with us
. >> that is something i'd expect maybe in china. or russia. but not united states. that is common sense you don't have, your president behind the polling. >> deputy secretary of the commonwealth shannon royer told fox news, "it's an absolute disgrace. election materials and election nearing inside the polling place are prohibited by state law. this can been interpreted as trying to influence voters inside the polling place. also in philadelphia, one member of the new black panthers party was back. in 2008, another carried a nightstick. but democratic poll watcher stood silently as we tried to get him to talk. >> have you been around a lot today? [ no response ] what is your purpose of being here? >> one election protection group reports receiving 40,000 cause of complaints nationwide. in ohio, these lawyers were handling frauds in the cuyahoga county board of elections where the officials vowed to watch for fraud. >> we ensure that all of our focus son all the details -- focus is on all the details. all the "i"s dotted and "t"s crossed. >> that is eric shawn in cleveland. >> megyn: as we wait for the
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